Real Estate

Don't Worry About Interest Rate Hikes

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  • Brenda Stroud has been buying real estate since the early 1990s.
  • She’s learned not to let factors outside of her control, like interest rates, affect whether or not she buys property.
  • Stroud also explains why she likes 5-year adjustable-rate mortgages.

Real estate investor Brenda Stroud isn’t one to sit on the sidelines during a high-interest rate environment.

She’s already done four real estate deals in 2023 and has two more under contract.

“You can’t have a doomsday mindset or attitude about things you cannot control,” the 55-year-old told Insider. “This is part of the business. Real estate is a risky business.”

Stroud bought her first home in the early 1990s. She was working as

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Forec

Ontario is lacking condo managers and some worry it'll only get worse as more units get built

Ontario property managers are raising the alarm about the province’s growing condo market, saying there’s not enough of them to handle an expected influx of units.

According to data from the province and the industry’s separate regulatory body, The Condominium Management Regulatory Authority of Ontario (CMRAO), there are currently some 2,500 licensed managers in the province overseeing around 950,000 units across Ontario. 

That’s a figure some in the industry say is leaving managers spread thin and will only be exacerbated by the glut of managers getting ready to retire. Add to that the growing number of units expected to be ready for occupancy in the coming years, and some worry the the lack of managers will mean issues across the board, be it for residents or building owners.

Research by the real estate consulting firm Urbanation suggesting a record number of 25,000 new condo units will be ready in Ontario

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Real Estate

Miami real estate worry about DeSantis backed bills on China

Real estate agents and academics say the bills HB 1355 and SB 264 could hurt the South Florida market by decreasing demand and leading to a dip in prices. Above: A photo of Sunny Isles Beach in Miami-Dade County, a community nicknamed Little Moscow for its large population of Russian residents and investors.

Real estate agents and academics say the bills HB 1355 and SB 264 could hurt the South Florida market by decreasing demand and leading to a dip in prices. Above: A photo of Sunny Isles Beach in Miami-Dade County, a community nicknamed Little Moscow for its large population of Russian residents and investors.

dsantiago@miamiherald.com

Limiting the buying power of foreign nationals from seven countries would weaken South Florida’s real estate market, experts in Miami’s real estate community said in criticizing legislation backed by Gov. Ron DeSantis.

The Miami Herald contacted 10 real estate agents, academics, lawyers and nonprofit leaders, they all agreed the bills would soften the South Florida residential market. The legislation could lead to slowing demand, price dips and less participation in programs such as the EB-5 immigrant investor program, in which investors in large real estate developments and their families can apply for green cards.

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